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Learning new skills – coaching vs training

Learning new skills – coaching vs training

A good leader knows that part of his or her role is to help in the development of each individual within their team. Leaders who believe they have a responsibility to develop their employees in their career benefit from having engaged and motivated staff who feel valued and fulfilled in their jobs, which makes for a work environment where financial success can flourish. ..

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Walk the walk and talk the talk

Walk the walk and talk the talk

For leaders wanting to create and sustain a positive, motivated work culture, using the right kind of language is essential. The language we use can affect how the message is perceived. The choice to use positive language is a great way to instantly create good impressions and lift the energy in a workplace. Using positive language, even when conveying adversities, can help to improve communication, reduce workplace tension, increase motivation of staff and build report.  ..

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Be a leader with an attitude of gratitude

Be a leader with an attitude of gratitude

Gratitude is an extremely powerful human attribute. The gratitude movement has gained a lot of momentum in recent years and for good reason. Martin Seligman’s Positive Psychology came out some thirty odd years ago, introducing the study of emotions such as gratitude, optimism, happiness, compassion and altruism. At the time, this was a revolutionary idea in the field of psychology since most of the studies about human emotion prior to this had focused on "negative psychology"; mental illness, trauma, addiction and stress. ..

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Collaboration and respect

Collaboration and respect

Friction in the workplace is part of life. It’s inevitable that when you gather a group of people together to work towards a common goal, friction will arise. We are all human and as such we are prone to good days and bad days, we are likely to get sick, feel tired at work and feel stressed from work and personal pressures. Friction happens simply from interacting with one another. Think of the friction you have experienced yourself; when you resent someone holding a meeting that drags on too long while you have a million other things you could be doing, or when someone interrupts you while you are trying to get an important task done with a looming deadline, when someone sends far too many unnecessary and long-winded emails or when someone doesn’t trust you enough to just do your job without breathing down your neck… whatever the reason, friction is an inevitable part of working life and something we have all experienced. While it is inevitable and unavoidable, it can also be dangerous for an organisation’s productivity if it gets out of hand.  ..

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